Author: U.S. Senate

PRIMARY DOCUMENT

U.S. Senate Resolution 39 (June 13, 2005)

In U.S. Senate Resolution 39, introduced on February 7, 2005, and approved six days later, the Senate apologizes for not responding to the epidemic of lynching in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The resolution's co-sponsors included Mary Landrieu, a Democrat from Louisiana, and George Allen, a Republican from Virginia.

PRIMARY DOCUMENT

Testimony of R. W. Glass (February 15, 1884)

In testimony before the U.S. Senate Committee on Privileges and Elections, given on February 15, 1884, R. W. Glass explains his role in the so-called Danville Riot of November 3, 1883, which left at least five people dead. The questioners are Zebulon Vance, a Democrat of North Carolina; and Elbridge G. Lapham, a Republican from New York. The following transcript contains racial epithets.

PRIMARY DOCUMENT

Testimony of Robert J. Adams (February 19, 1884)

In testimony before the U.S. Senate Committee on Privileges and Elections, given on February 19, 1884, Robert J. Adams, an African American police officer in Danville, explains his role in the so-called Danville Riot of November 3, 1883, which left at least five people dead. The questioners are the committee’s chairman, John Sherman, a Republican from Ohio; Zebulon Vance, a Democrat of North Carolina; and Elbridge G. Lapham, a Republican from New York. The following transcript contains racial epithets.

PRIMARY DOCUMENT

Testimony of Hense Lawson (February 18, 1884)

In testimony before the U.S. Senate Committee on Privileges and Elections, given on February 18, 1884, Henderson “Hense” Lawson explains his role in the so-called Danville Riot of November 3, 1883, which left at least five people dead. The questioners are the committee’s chairman, John Sherman, a Republican from Ohio, and Zebulon Vance, a Democrat of North Carolina. The following transcript contains racial epithets.

PRIMARY DOCUMENT

Testimony of George A. Lea (February 15, 1884)

In testimony before the U.S. Senate Committee on Privileges and Elections, given on February 15, 1884, George Lea explains his role in the so-called Danville Riot of November 3, 1883, which left at least five people dead. The questioners are the committee’s chairman, John Sherman, a Republican from Ohio; Zebulon Vance, a Democrat of North Carolina; and Elbridge G. Lapham, a Republican from New York. The following transcript contains racial epithets.

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