• Sally HemingsAt the heart of Virginia's most enduring scandal. Did Sally Hemings bear Thomas Jefferson's children? Our biographical entry considers the question while providing the most complete online collection of primary documents related to Hemings's life. Readers can peruse everything from an 1873 newspaper interview with Madison Hemings to a more recent report on DNA evidence. And with luck, the historical Sally Hemings does not get lost in the furor. (Image courtesy of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation)
  • Indians in VirginiaA broad overview of the history and culture of Virginia's Indians. Our entry includes information on the languages, religions, and politics of Indians at the time Jamestown was founded. It explains where such information comes from. And, finally, it follows the tribes into the twenty-first century, from assimilation and near cultural annihilation to, for a number of tribes, state recognition. (Image courtesy of The Mariners' Museum, Newport News, Virginia)
  • Indentured Servants in Colonial VirginiaFilling an inexhaustible need in colonial Virginia. Elite Virginians required laborers and found them in indentured servants. Our entry explains why so many men and women were willing to risk their lives in the wilds of Virginia, how the system worked, and why, eventually, it gave way to racial slavery. Primary documents, meanwhile, help flesh out their lived experiences. The story of Jane Dickenson is particularly poignant. (Image courtesy of the University of Virginia Special Collections)
  • Harry F. Byrd Sr."He ruled not with a command but with a nod." Harry F. Byrd may have been the most important Virginia politician of the twentieth century, serving as state senator, governor, and U.S. senator and running a strict Democratic political machine. A responsible, pay-as-you-go approach to fiscal management serves as one of his legacies, but so does Massive Resistance. (Image courtesy of the University of Virginia Special Collections)
  • Robert E. LeeThe marble man. One of the iconic figures in Virginia history, Robert E. Lee led the Army of Northern Virginia during the Civil War and Washington and Lee College after it. Our entry is written by Elizabeth Brown Pryor, author of Reading the Man: A Portrait of Robert E. Lee through His Private Letters, which won the prestigious Lincoln Prize in 2008. Pryor died in a car accident near her Richmond home on April 14, 2015. We at Encyclopedia Virginia are grateful to have worked with her and offer our condolences to her family. (Image courtesy of the Valentine Richmond History Center)
  • Mary Anna Randolph Custis LeeArtist, activist, wife. The great-granddaughter of Martha Washington and the wife of Robert E. Lee, Mary Anna Randolph Custis Lee was nevertheless a complex and interesting woman in her own right. Our entry is written by Elizabeth Brown Pryor, author of Reading the Man: A Portrait of Robert E. Lee through His Private Letters, which won the prestigious Lincoln Prize in 2008. Pryor died in a car accident near her Richmond home on April 14, 2015. We at Encyclopedia Virginia are grateful to have worked with her and offer our condolences to her family. (Image courtesy Arlington House)